How We're Seen...

 For many, this job is one of the most misunderstood professions. It's along the same lines as those that don't understand video games. It's a diversion, it's easy, you're only a writer if people are reading your shit (Thanks, United States of Leland). However, it really comes down to this: writing is a full-time job. Even if you have another one, if you're going to succeed you have to leave that other job, then sit your ass down and write. 

I have been failing at that recently, as my job has started to push 50, 60 hours a week. I am able to dedicate just enough time to complete these posts (which are important in their own right), but my novels are suffering for it. That's not to say I'm going to slow down, just more than I need to focus and start carving out more time to work on these projects rather than simply throwing myself into these posts, then saying, "Well, I've only got ten minutes left of my hour, guess I'll write half a page." Now this is coupled with the struggle I'm having figuring out where The Magician is going to end up, but we've dealt with that in the previous posts.

So, in an effort to get back to The Magician (which soon will have its own page), the rest of this post will feature my favorite representations of writing:

I absolutely love this clip. Adaptation as a whole, even. It's a great representation of all the anxieties of authors that most movies miss.

Finding Forrester - While I don't agree with his advice (The key to writing is to write, not to think), it's fun to see how quickly the words pour out of him while Wallace just stares at him.

From Twixt, by Francis Ford Coppola. In the lead up to his scene, he convinces his agent that he can write this, but is expressly forbidden from writing about the fog on the lake.

From the end of Moulin Rouge - While this isn't a great writing scene, it's more of a perfect representation of what many writers wish they could attain. I've had several writer friends that have mentioned loving the visual of pages tacked all over the walls, though I don't see how that's be manageable at all.

From the end of Moulin Rouge - While this isn't a great writing scene, it's more of a perfect representation of what many writers wish they could attain. I've had several writer friends that have mentioned loving the visual of pages tacked all over the walls, though I don't see how that's be manageable at all.

What are your favorite representations of writing or writers? And what type of reactions have you had to your writing, if that's your chosen profession?

Jump by Anton Semenov

Jump by Anton Semenov

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Justin D. Herd

Justin D. Herd is a purveyor of the weird and strange. He occasionally squawks at friends and family, but does so only under the cover of night. Okay, that's not true. He squawks in full daylight. Drinking games have been built around his peculiarities, but the truth of it is this: he is a loving husband, with two wonderful dem--children. One growls at things he likes, including pretty women. The other has started to learn hand-eye coordination. Neither had made it to the tender age of three. From there, things will only get more interesting. He spends most of his writing time either at a coffee shop or sitting at one of his many desks around his house. Any other place makes it nearly impossible for him to write. He uses horror movies and rock music to help get the juices flowing. His favorite authors are Jeremy Robert Johnson, Alan Campbell, Terry Pratchett, Justin Cronin, and Patrick Rothfuss. He consumes most of his books through audiobooks, but still loves his personal library and getting lost in the printed word.